♣ Different forms of integration

"♣": Estrategias específicas empleadas por los estudios de caso para incrementar su nivel de auto-sustentabilidad.Pueden estar en inglés o español. Por favor usa el traductor del menú lateral 

"♣": Specific strategies used by the case studies to increase their degree of self-sustainability.They might be in English or in Spanish. Please use the side menu translator
    • Because of the above, initiatives have set different strategies to enhance the comprehensiveness of their interventions and, for those already operating in a model of integrated service delivery, to strengthen the interconnections between the different components of their programs (health, education, water facilities, etc.). These include:
      • Undertaking systemic interventions that address the different stakeholders’ needs and interests that either globally or locally concern the initiative • Setting up an area specifically oriented towards reinforcing institutional integration — in charge of ensuring that the different programs and administrative processes of the initiative are all designed, monitored, and evaluated in coordination, working transversally, and supporting each other (so that they can share their human, infrastructural, financial, and other resources)
      •  Working through trans-sectoral partnerships with other initiatives operating in target communities with diverse development agendas (both public and private), in the understanding that these collaborations are designed by and subject to the control of the local people. Capitalizing and building on already existing efforts and/or establishing win-win alliances saves resources and energy, and boosts the potential of each of the initiatives involved. Moreover, taking advantage of their inputs (services, methodologies, resources, etc.) can help in  filling the gaps that the initiative itself cannot cover, expanding the communities’ access to a wide variety of social programs that, supporting one another, become more relevant to more of them
      •  Appointing stakeholders who can better help in linking the initiative with outside support, in giving visibility and scaling the initiative’s know-how abroad (which helps in attracting further support) and in enhancing the quality of established partnerships by helping the local stakeholders to convert external inputs in a way that is locally relevant
      •  Building structures for participation and negotiation as a transversal dimension that enables the negotiation among the different internal and external stakeholders involved and the identification of their interests and needs
      •  Combining all funds collected for a particular program or sector of the population and using them in the benefit of the entire target community, and not only the sponsored sector or area.

     

    • Capitalizing on people’s ownership and empowerment, and making social participation a transversal dimension of the initiative helps in making better use of the local political and financial resources already available, which are needed to sustain the initiatives over time. Fostering them can further help in filling the gaps of the development initiative, and thus, in reducing the need of external support (dependency) — by facilitating that the internal stakeholders share their diverse products, services, and other resources, the need to acquire external funds to cover them is minimized.

     

    • By having education as an important component of broader development models, initiatives can further promote developmental sustainability in the sense of: enhancing educational participation across generations (we know that educated mothers tend to seek ways of educating their children) and, building local capacity to support other development programs.

     

    • Integrating the schools within a network of development programs

     

    • Besides receiving education, the [This/the initiative] students benefit from health services, communication resources, toys, and learning materials provided by other development programs operated by the organization. This includes solar-powered lamps that allow the operation of the schools at night in areas in which there is frequently no electricity grid. Another aspect of the integrated development program sees to the building of rainwater harvesting tanks adjacent to each Night School, which helps to ensure that families in semi-desert areas will still be provided with water by their children, even if they attend school during the hours they would otherwise spend collecting it from wells. The fact that the Night Schools are embedded in a mutually supportive network of initiatives grounded in the[This/the initiative] facilitates attention to the children’s and their families’ diverse and specific needs.

     

    • This comprehensive model also allows for the sharing of funds among different projects to support one another, and for the shared provision of materials, personnel, training, and infrastructure across the different projects. Some examples of the benefits of this integration are the Field Research Centres’ and Associate Partner Organizations’ roles as meeting points for a Children’s Parliament (a key project in this comprehensive model, which will be shortly introduced), and the fact that many Night Schools’ alumni are incorporated into the[This/the initiative] ’s development projects. Alumni work as, for example, solar engineers, coordinators of craft workshops or of the local early childhood education centres, cooks for the[This/the initiative] community, or as cultural workers in the community. Others extend the benefits of the[This/the initiative] into the mainstream education system at the Siksha Karmi and Siksha Niketa schools. Further examples of this integration among projects lie in the training offered to teachers by the[This/the initiative] ’s Health Centre to identify common health issues in their students, and in the vocational training that the children receive.

     

    • The communities themselves prepare the teaching and learning materials. Among them, a workshop of disabled people prepares toys made of recyclable materials for the Night Schools, and a carpentry workshop provides them with science toys. Maps and posters displaying the alphabet hang on the walls of the schools. Children frequently need to share the learning materials that are available.

     

    • Teachers are prepared in a ten-day training program run annually during the off-season, and they meet monthly to discuss teaching methods and problems, and to improve their teaching skills. Teachers are also taught to repair the solar lamps and, as mentioned earlier, to identify common health issues in their students.

     

    • The mission of the[This/the initiative] ’s Communications team is worth noting here. Through puppetry, a traditional means in this cultural context of sharing messages with the community, the[This/the initiative] discusses in an interactive manner some of the problems faced by the Night Schools, such as the need for girls’ attendance, the safety of the children, their relationship with their teachers, and so on. In a related vein, the Night Schools hold the annual Balmela Festival to provide feedback to their communities, to reinforce the value of education, and to thank them for their help and participation.

     

    • strong context integration in order to ensure equal access to quality education

     

    • In contrast to the frequently punitive measures employed by local authorities to ensure school attendance (for example, making an educational qualification a prerequisite for a driving license), the[This/the initiative] , mindful of the causes that prevent families from accessing education, looks for the children in most need and adapts its program to their local socio-economic and cultural context. This is not only a key aspect of the[This/the initiative] ‘s success in attracting these children into school, but a primary source of its self-sustainability and of the quality and relevance of the education they provide.

     

    • The degree of ownership felt by the communities of these projects enhances their trust of the[This/the initiative] and their confidence to send their children to the Night Schools. The opportunity costs of school attendance and community involvement in the projects are compensated by this sense of ownership, which is also a result of a widely decentralized budgeting process. The communities are deeply involved with the program: they manage it, they contribute to it, and they benefit from it.

     

    • Through their integrated schemes, they are enabling the sustainability of the resources that enable the communities’ subsistence, while reaching the organization’s objective of preventing the exploitation of the forests and addressing the socio-economic needs of the communities at the same time.

     

    • The Parity/Matching Funds Scheme:

    Funding comes from a variety of sources in exchange for an active commitment by the communities who own the forests, to take the necessary actions to ensure that the forests are always kept strictly intact – which means not exploiting them and not allowing anyone else to do so. The funds are used to compensate the communities for revenue lost, resulting from their abstention to economically exploit their forests.

    Some of these funding mechanisms are obtained through parity or matching fund schemes where, in exchange for the communities’ contribution consisting on their commitment to keep the forests intact, entities such as the National Forestry Commission (Mexico) provides 1 Mexican peso for each peso that[This/the initiative] obtains from other financial sources to help the community to achieve the same objective – which is basically to preserve the environmental services that forests provide. Other mechanisms consist of financial contributions on the condition that the said commitment is verifiably met, and that the community engages in undertaking active forest conservation activities.

    Like the National Forestry Commission in Mexico, many institutions are concerned about the lack of direct involvement (ownership) that most development projects have on the part of the beneficiaries. Frequently, beneficiaries’ involvement and ownership of the project demonstrates that the donors’ investment has greater possibilities of surviving and leaving a lasting effect.

     

    • The Participation in the Carbon Bond Market Scheme:

    Donations are possible to a large extent as a result of the project’s intention to participate in the carbon bond market through an intermediary. The carbon bond market is an international instrument to account the emission of greenhouse gasses which are not produced or are reduced as a result of compensatory measures such as the generation of renewable energy, improvement of energy efficiency process, afforestation, avoided deforestation, lakes and rivers cleaning, etc., to voluntarily mitigate the environmental damage caused. These bonds are translated into carbon emission certificates (CERs), each one equivalent to one tonne of carbon dioxide (CO2) reduced or avoided, which can be redeemed for a price set by the international market rules. The carbon bond market is one of the internationally recognized mechanisms that allow particulars and public and private organizations become conscious of their responsibility towards climate change, and participate actively by selling or buying CERs to comply with the objectives of mitigating the environmental damage caused.

    To participate in this market,[This/the initiative] hired an intermediary entity – Terra Global Capital (from San Francisco) – for the design and promotion of the project within the international carbon bond market and the payment for the services to the beneficiaries. Therefore, all red tape procedures for this scheme are done by intermediary companies like this one that budget their payment themselves.

    Regarding the Participation in the Carbon Bond Market Scheme:

    One of[This/the initiative] ’s main strengths and most well-known contributions in the development field is the Solar Energy Program, which is already greatly intertwined with its other initiatives – including the Night Schools – that are largely possible due the provision of the solar lanterns that allow them to run at night. Moreover, many Night School alumni participate in the Solar Energy Program once they have graduated.

    This means that, so far, the Night Schools are already part of the Solar Energy Program, which generates renewable energy and therefore is eligible to participate in schemes such as the carbon bond market.

     

    • Recommendation made in the[This/the initiative] Study:

    R5: To design a strategy to integrate more solidly and consciously the Solar Night Schools Program to the[This/the initiative] ’s UNESCO Learning Centres for Sustainable Community Development (Mason & Maclean, 2011), and find an intermediary (such as Terra Global Capital) that introduces it to the international carbon bond market and deals with all the procedures involved in this funding source.

     

    • Money collected by this means can also be included into the Capital Fund (see R3) and ensured through a Trust Fund (see R4) as[This/the initiative] does to strengthen the financial sustainability of its project.

     

    • inspired by the[This/the initiative] , which has operated from Mexico City since 1996 promoting alternative barter markets (of products and services), local university teachers in 2010 created an alternative market project popularly known as “The[This/the initiative] Project” as a tool to boost the local economy (promoting the circulation of goods which had no buyers due to the absence of conventional money in the place) and reduce external dependence (on resources and on the values from the printing and distribution of economic currency).

    The Tumin is a voucher that is complementary to the peso, the Mexican currency. It seeks to support family income serving as a means of facilitating the development of an alternative exchange dynamic: the barter system (which actually used to be the traditional exchange system in the region).

    Vouchers are used to exchange goods with value equal to (but not worth) 1 Mexican Peso ($ 0.08 USD approx.), backed up by the goods and services offered by its partners, which are listed in a directory so that its members can compromise to support each other. A coordinating team, which is rotatory (ensuring the equitable representation of and responsibilisation of all of the members) monitors and evaluates the project. It is made up of Commissions (education, communication, etc.) that are in charge of organizing various issues related to the project, ensuring its integrative character.

     

    • The prototype alternative market model promoted by[This/the initiative] and that inspired the[This/the initiative] Project, comprises, according to Luis Lopezllera’s “Money is not enough, what to do?” Manual (2008), the integration of an alternative economic system that includes at least the following:

    1. The granting of memberships for partners.

    2. The signing of a letter of commitment agreed on the rules of the exchange.

    3. The creation of a user directory based on the planning of a consumer basket (that defines what kind of partners are needed, including foreign partners, if the locals cannot fulfil the need).

    4. The training in person and/or through a brief Operation Manual.

    5. The provision of the barter/exchange vouchers to the partners.

    6. The creation of a regular newsletter that accompanies and strengthens the project.

    7. The creation and distribution of educational and publicizing materials.

    8. The establishment of a promotional team (volunteers).

    9. The organization of regular meetings for the project’s development.

    10. The organization of decisional deliberative assemblies of associated partners (decentralization).

    11. The establishment of cellular stores for the public (that link together, give certainty, and facilitate the buying of products for those who cannot attend the market’s meetings because of logistical problems).

    12. The organization of local fairs, private or public, gatherings, visits, courses, and workshops (introductory lectures and retreats).

    13. The organization of regional or national meetings (with similar networks).

    14. The use of advanced communication and dissemination means.

    15. The procurement of infrastructure and support resources (property for the shop and office, meeting room, exhibition room, furniture, telephone, computer, projector, transportation, support fund, etc.).

    The Assembly, which has (as one of its objectives) the constant evaluation of the project, is made up of Commissions that are in charge of organizing various issues related to the[This/the initiative] Project. Thus, there are Commissions on Education (to teach children new economic values such as solidarity), Communication (broadcasting the project), Distribution (which dispenses the Tumin), etc.

    The above mentioned directory lists all the goods and services whose purchase accepts payment with Tumin (food, carpentry, tourism, education services, etc.). These businesses are also promoted through the magazine mentioned in subsection “d” of the previous point. The diversity of the partners is a crucial factor, because it allows a balance between the needs and the supply (says the current coordinator of the[This/the initiative] Project).

     

    • The Children’s Parliament is itself a model for the exchange of ideas. This could be the basis for the exchange of other valuables (knowledge, things… it would be necessary to define what, from a participatory assessment of what is in the region in terms of credits of trust, alienation. Namely: to go from parliamentarianism to economy with something that replaces money – or complements it – being careful not to replicate the criticized existing schemes).

     

    • An alternative economic model could complement the[This/the initiative] ‘s initiatives to curb migration and promote autonomy, depending less on foreign aid. Also, it could reinforce the[This/the initiative] ‘s beneficiaries’ organization and participation schemes, including the Night Schools, supporting, for example, the barter of teaching and learning materials, and complementing, perhaps, teachers’ salaries with partial payments in kind or similar measures

     

    • With a well-planned strategy, the introduction of a barter/exchange system with a tool similar to that used in the [This/the initiative] Project could encourage the circulation and benefits obtained from the products currently manufactured by the[This/the initiative] (in general: solar lanterns, sanitary napkins, etc., or by the schools program in particular: the wooden toys produced by the program’s children, etc.).

     

    • The[This/the initiative] Project’s model is not intended to be scalable, but the local autonomous economy model that promotes solidarity and local production is. Retrieving experience from the[This/the initiative] Project and[This/the initiative] ’s initiatives (or from any other of the many thousands of alternative currencies – economies – that today are being multiplied in the world) can become a tool to reinforce the self-sustainability in the implementation, and therefore the scope, of the programs undertaken by the[This/the initiative] , by attacking the roots of dependency with a systemic, integral perspective

     

    • [This/the initiative] model for Integrative Development
    [This/the initiative] initiatives are divided into Territorial Development, Health, Education, Culture, and Communication, and they are all structured through a permanent process of Institutional Integration.

    The Territorial Development Program is the basis of the social and political support of all of[This/the initiative] ‘s work, since it enables people to manage their own development by strengthening their self-management capacities and adapting the program to local conditions.

    The program assists local leaders seeking to ensure ownership of popular initiatives implemented by the project as a whole, and works primarily to consolidate the process of land use and land tenure…strengthening regional representations in the social control of public policies in defense of their land, and good stewardship of their natural resources for economic, social, and environmental viability (x).

    For this purpose they use participatory mapping, a methodology through which the communities sit together to draw a map of their region, and:

    a. Document the territory where they live;

    b. Gather all their information to construct geographic databases;

    c. Determine the most relevant problems;

    d. Visualize business opportunities in the region; and

    e. Use them as a basis to program both[This/the initiative] ‘s and the government’s developmental intervention in the region, and to manage their own lands, enable territorial regularization, and promote the sustainable use of local resources.

    The mapping serves as a “document of reality” that allows not only [This/the initiative] but also government bodies to better design their policies and programs in the region in different areas.

    The Sustainable Entrepreneurship Program, for example, implements demonstrative initiatives for resources’ management and the acquisition of legal certifications to increase family income generation, increase food security, and reduce the impact on the environment, as socioeconomic strategic components to improve the quality of life, environmental conservation, and regional development (e.g. the communitarian ecotourism or the crafts production with local forest’s resources).

    As mentioned earlier,[This/the initiative] started as a health delivery program, providing adapted technologies such as micro-systems for the provision and treatment of water, house filters, wells, and rustic pits.

    In the year 2006, the organization acquired a boat (the Abare Ship) that, making regular rounds from community to community, approached people with an interdisciplinary team presented as Mocorongo Great Circus teaching people means to take care of their hygiene and prevent diseases with fun and participatory games. Personnel from the boat also offered basic medical and dental attention, vaccinations, family planning trainings, minor surgeries, etc.

    The success of the project resulted in its absorption by the Brazilian Ministry of Health and in its escalation to State level in 2010.

    [This/the initiative] has never had schools. Compulsory Education’s coverage in the area is almost 100%, partly because of[This/the initiative] ’s advocacy efforts in the last 20 years. It rather had focus on complementary activities to the work of public schools. Since more than 53% of the local population is below 19 years old,[This/the initiative] mainly works with children and the youth with programs for community and environmental education, cultural promotion and diffusion, digital inclusion, and complementary actions for schools. During the latter, local education-related actors (communities, schools, and multiplier of actions) are trained to create supporting regionalized learning materials with participatory methodologies. This counteracts the lack of relevance of local schools’ curricula.

    As with the health program, while[This/the initiative] ’s efforts where concentrated until not long ago into complementing schools’ activities, they are now focused on a partnership with 5 schools, the Carlos Chagas Foundation, and the Education Ministry of Santarem municipality, to work on a pilot project for making education for the Amazonian populations more relevant.

    For this purpose, they also use the participatory mapping methodology. Children draw maps of their communities that include not only their inhabitants, but also their institutions, geographical conditions, resources, etc. This methodology helps both[This/the initiative] and educators to identify the perception children have about the place they live, what is important, whose concepts are embedded into their mindset, etc. Based on these concepts and images,[This/the initiative] helps educators and school authorities to sensitize teachers about what is relevant in the region (many teachers are not from the communities where they work), and adapt local materials and the curricula with images, subjects, and methodologies that are more familiar to the children.

    The objective of this partnership is to set an example of how to improve the quality of the public schools in the region that, if successful, is to be scaled to the whole municipality. That is, as the case of the health program, to serve as a demonstrative experience that aims at being escalated by the State, with the argument that it is the latter’s responsibility to provide access to quality education for all. The project so far has been stopped because the Carlos Chagas Foundation cancelled all of its funding this year.

    [This/the initiative] uses a few interesting strategies to ensure its financial sustainability, which are in charge of its Area of Institutional Integration. This area is responsible for integrating the organization’s diverse programs, determining institutional articulations and policies, planning the dissemination, expansion, and replication of the model, and ensuring their sustainability.

    • integrating the work of different areas, consolidating the model’s impact

     

    • Work with partnerships both with the communities and with institutions abroad, from the public and the private sector, and with diverse development agendas. This enables the organization to expand these communities’ access not only to primary health but also to a wide variety of social programs that support one another with the transference, adaptation, and application of appropriate social technologies and also in terms of funding (x). It also benefits the foreign partners because they make good use of[This/the initiative] ’s experience, know-how, and credibility in the region to access it.

     

    • [This/the initiative] works in partnerships with the communities, creating or strengthening local organizations that are independent from[This/the initiative] itself, thus limiting its financial and administrative responsibility and ensuring their autonomy (x).

     

    • Based on the social technique (mentioned before) called “participatory mapping”,[This/the initiative] makes, altogether with the communities it serves, a diagnosis of local conditions, challenges, problems, and priorities and, based on them, it uses art, games, and communication as means for each of its programs. The participatory mapping not only allows the communities to visualize themselves and their context but to become agents of their own development, and define strategies and roles. The above is particularly important because the local population lacks an entrepreneurial mindset, most probably as a consequence of a governmental intervention that has not been particularly keen to include them in its development programs (x.). Although it is not voluntary, the social ownership and participation created with[This/the initiative] ’s participatory methodologies functions as its model’s basis and source of sustainability, “because this way the communities become part of the projects’ developers and not only their beneficiaries” (x).

     

    • [This/the initiative] ’s development model is integrated because of the interconnections that exist amongst its various interventions, which are emphasized in the understanding that attending the communities’ needs in an integral way implies recognizing that community life is integral itself; that all age sectors have to be attended; and, that one area can support another because it is frequently the same people that are involved.[This/the initiative] ’s institutional integration process consists of consolidating each area’s relevant institutions and trying to establish a transversal project.

    However, to achieve this level of integration is very difficult, as many factors work against it: The responsibilities of[This/the initiative] ’s staff are distributed by areas and each area’s responsible has to be accountable for the programs at his/her charge, to ensure maintaining donors support. While all personnel are encouraged to be involved in all areas of work, they can only do it superficially because they have to concentrate on their own projects. Most importantly, the donors support very concrete/thematic agendas. Their funding criteria are not integral and they expect concrete results in concrete areas. So each area coordinator is generally responsible for the results of its domain and not the other.

    • Ensures all its personnel are at least aware of the purpose and situation of[This/the initiative] ’s other initiatives.

     

    • Distributes the funding collected across initiatives.

     

    • Searches for partnerships that not only expand the amount of services provided to the communities it serves but the support of one initiative to another.

     

    • The circus integrates the way people learn, conceptualize, and appropriate[This/the initiative] ’s initiatives because it uses different languages (dancing, singing, talking) to interrelate knowledge.

     

    • Uses PMES annual cycles (planning, monitoring, evaluation, and systematization) to ensure the organization’s initiatives are working transversally. So, for example, in January and February the organization devotes itself to define and publish its annual plan (which includes objectives, activities, indicators, expected outcomes, and funding administration and sources). In June and July, they do a mid-year evaluation and adapt the plan accordingly. And finally, in December they make an annual evaluation and plan the next cycle.

     

    • priority is given to the Institutional Integration (which includes developing its communication means, inter-institutional agreements, methodological exchanges and consultancies, adapted socio-environmental expansion, transference, dissemination, and replication processes).

     

    • Finally, stage 3 is suggested to be about articulating the Amazon with other regions around the globe, attracting proactive and strategic connections.

     

    • the option of creating local entrepreneurship initiatives (like[This/the initiative] ’s communitarian ecotourism) that provide children with future options for employment, help the organization to disseminate its programs abroad, and function as parallel enterprises that not only incorporate Night Schools’ alumni into the local economy but help in the funding of the Night Schools. If programmed well, this specialized tourism could also help to diversify the Night Schools’ funding sources.

     

    • Consolidate a network of “multiplier” agents with the Night Schools alumni, especially those that participated in the children’s parliament

     

    • The model’s success in raising schools’ quality relates to its comprehensive focus on academic improvement, equity in education opportunities, and the community’s involvement (the model counts, for example, with a Children’s and a Parents’ government that run the school).

     

    • highly self-sustainable because: a) it is systemic – works with teachers, students, and parents in all educational aspects

     

    • it is trans-sectoral – it promotes the formation of skills as the basis of entrepreneurship reducing rural children’s migration to the cities, and emphasis is put on children’s application of their knowledge within their family and community;

     

    • it promotes interculturality – the national curriculum is reinforced but they place strong emphasis on the relevance of education and the appreciation of rural life and local knowledge, which has immediate effects in the community’s life and, as a result, in the involvement of parents in the learning process.

     

    • It is trans-sectorial because it promotes the formation of skills as the basis of entrepreneurship (including those for pacific coexistence, health, garbage management, environment, etc.). They emphasize on children’s application of their knowledge within their family and community. One of the main successes of[This/the initiative] ’s model is that it offers very concrete elements to motivate children’s participation with the community. It is important to say that creating these entrepreneurial skills has been a useful tool to prevent rural children’s migration to the cities.

     

    • [This/the initiative] International has 75 years of experience working with marginalized children and their communities in 31 countries, working in partnership with already existing local organizations, enterprises, and parent committees (a strategy that enables them to make better use of its efforts and resources) to identify key local problems and possible solutions (health, education, micro-enterprises, etc.), all of them family oriented.

     

    • matches donations of enterprises and their employees with community sponsorship programs

     

    • [This/the initiative] promotes that enterprises invest in opening local cooperatives where an agreement is made with the participants that they will take care of their families and communities (e.g. bring their children to school) provided that a job is being offered to them and that there is already a buyer for their products (with fair prices). The cooperative’s surpluses are used to reinvest in the cooperative, cover the organization’s operation costs, pay the salaries of the cooperative’s employees, and invest in the community – e.g. on one of the NGO’s initiatives in that same community. With such a model, enterprises benefit with tax deductions (Corporate Social Responsibility) and ensure suppliers. The community, on the other hand, benefits by settling cooperatives that stimulate local production, promoting employment to the families, and reducing migration rates to the cities (as happens with the[This/the initiative] and the[This/the initiative] Project). It also benefits from the agreement made with the participants about taking care of their families and communities, and from the investment that is done of the surpluses into initiatives that help improve its overall living conditions.

     

    • [This/the initiative] strategies are quite comprehensive and integrative in reach because all funds collected are used to support both the sponsored child (and the different dimensions of its needs such as nutrition, medical attention, clean water, educational books, materials, teachers, etc.) and the whole community (clean water for drinking and health care). This means that all funds are combined and used to benefit all children and their community, and not only the sponsored children.

     

    • Other strategies are specifically addressed to avoid creating dependency relations. In concrete, the community sponsorship programs are intended for a specific target: ensure the community’s self-sustainability in an agreed period of time. The money to find the partner enterprise comes from[This/the initiative] ’s main office and it is recovered from the money the enterprise provides in the sponsorship budget.[This/the initiative] is an officially registered civil organization and each of its local offices is an officially registered civil organization as well, and not a part of[This/the initiative] ’s main office. So the budget goes to increasing the community’s Civil Association’s self-sustainability through capacity building programs (training them on getting funds, managing programs, establishing cooperatives, increasing social participation, etc.). The enterprise and[This/the initiative] make an agreement where the local Civil Association (the community organized) ensures results in a certain period of time (10, 20 years), and if there are not results (periodical evaluations are made) the funding is stopped. In short: the partnership contemplates an Exit Plan for both the enterprise and the[This/the initiative] ’s main office with the intention of ensuring a decentralized development program

     

    • [This/the initiative] International has 75 years of experience working with marginalized children and their communities in 31 countries (approx. 17.8 million children and their families participated by 2012) subsidizing the scarce local resources to “empower a cycle of improvement that touches every member of society” and “create the environments children need to thrive” (x). They also work with local groups and parent committees to identify key local problems and possible solutions, all of them family oriented, such as:

    a. Trainings/awareness programs about child protection (e.g. for parents).

    b. Early childhood psychosocial, health, and education support.

    c. Youth unemployment skills training.

    d. Health care and sanitation (nutrition: establishing renewable resources of food and safe water).

    e. Basic education (building schools, vocational skills)

    f. Micro-enterprises/jobs for generating family income.

    g. Emergencies programs for children that are victims of wars and natural disasters.

    The funds they collect are used to support both the sponsored child (basic needs such as nutrition, medical attention, clean water, educational books, materials, teachers, etc.), and the whole community (clean water for drinking and health care). This means that all funds collected are combined and used to benefit all children and their community, and not only the sponsored children.

     

    • Finding enterprises whose employees match the donations collected for community sponsorship. Differently from the matching/parity schemes used by Amigos de Calakmul and[This/the initiative] ,[This/the initiative] usually uses this scheme with enterprises that work permanently with one particular region/population (e.g. a coffee enterprise that buys most of its coffee from one region). The scheme[This/the initiative] uses is to link the enterprises employees with the communities they work with is implementing a dynamic where each employee donates a certain percentage of his salary to the NGO’s initiative/program in the community, and the enterprise doubles that amount. This strengthens the wellbeing both of the community and the company’s employees. The employees are invited to inquire in their enterprises’ Human Research Department if their company already has a “matching gift program” and join it. The sponsorships are intended to a specific target: ensure the community’s self-sustainability in an agreed period of time. The money to find the partner enterprise comes from the[This/the initiative] ’s main branch, and it is recovered from the money the enterprise provides in the sponsorship budget. This budget is allocated into capacity building programs for the community.[This/the initiative] is a Civil Association and each of its local offices are Civil Associations as well, and not a part of[This/the initiative] ’s main office. So the budget goes to increasing the community Civil Association’s self-sustainability (training them on getting funds, managing programs, establishing cooperatives, increasing social participation, etc.). The Enterprise and[This/the initiative] make an agreement where the local Civil Association (the community organized) ensures results over a certain period of time (10, 20 years), and if there are not results (periodical evaluations) the funding is stopped. In short: the partnership contemplates an Exit Plan of both the enterprise and[This/the initiative] ’s main branch with the intention of ensuring a decentralized development program.

     

    • El Banco de Tiempo de [Esta/la iniciativa] es un espacio virtual y real donde se hacen intercambios de servicios por servicios utilizando el tiempo como moneda social.

     

    • complementariedad oferta-demanda es crucial.

    El Banco de Tiempo de[Esta/la iniciativa] fue creado en 2011 como medida para ayudar a recuperar el tejido social de la región, tan lastimado por la inseguridad, promoviendo la confianza y la creación de redes de amistad y cooperación. El proyecto además busca atender los problemas causados por la falta de dinero convencional, proponiendo una moneda de intercambio alternativa (el tiempo) que evita a la comunidad participante la necesidad de gastar el poco dinero con el que cuenta, en tanto sea capaz de identificar y atender las necesidades de sus miembros mediante el intercambio de servicios valorados en horas tiempo.

     

    • El[Esta/la iniciativa]   busca, desde 2008, atender una de las más importantes carencias de la Universidad X: la desvinculación que existe entre sus miembros e instituciones, y con otros sectores de la sociedad, y que le impide aprovechar al máximo el capital intelectual de su comunidad para atender problemas del país que por su naturaleza multi-factorial y multidimensional, requieren de análisis e intervenciones integrales.

    Ese es precisamente el objetivo del[Esta/la iniciativa] : catalizar discusiones pertinentes y desarrollar las herramientas estructurales, conceptuales y metodológicas que faciliten que cualquier miembro de la universidad, independientemente de su campo de conocimiento o adscripción, tenga las condiciones apropiadas trabajar de forma colaborativa (inter y/o transdisciplinaria) en estos problemas transversales, aportando sus diversos enfoques y conocimientos. Esto tanto para proyectos a largo plazo como para la efectiva respuesta de la comunidad académica a problemáticas emergentes con carácter urgente. Entre estas herramientas el[Esta/la iniciativa] ha ideado, hasta ahora, la celebración de reuniones focales y foros de análisis, el préstamo de sus instalaciones para encuentros entre la comunidad universitaria, la puesta en práctica de seminarios, cursos y congresos amparados en programas sombrilla con carácter presuntamente transversal y sujetos a evaluación periódica de pertinencia — varios de ellos accesibles a agentes externos gracias a un sistema de telecomunicaciones que permite su transmisión en vivo a través del internet, extendiendo su impacto y facilitando vías alternativas de comunicación y cooperación. Además, el[Esta/la iniciativa] propone el paradigma de la complejidad, que cuestiona la capacidad de las actuales herramientas disciplinarias de investigación, docencia y divulgación para comprender y abordar dichos problemas, y aporta nuevos enfoques, recursos, métodos, y metodologías. El Centro también le ha apostado a una organización y estructura administrativas que buscan ser flexibles y de buen balance costo-beneficio con miras a garantizar la relevancia, integralidad y capacidad de resiliencia de su proyecto.

    Además, el[Esta/la iniciativa] propone el paradigma de la complejidad, que cuestiona la capacidad de las actuales herramientas disciplinarias de investigación, docencia y divulgación para comprender y abordar dichos problemas, y aporta nuevos enfoques, recursos, métodos, y metodologías

    • trabajo inter o transdisciplinario

     

    • El[Esta/la iniciativa] es un proyecto ambicioso, y por ello conseguir el cumplimiento de su misión le exige intensificar sus esfuerzos con un enfoque sistémico (integral) y sustentable. Esto es, con intervenciones en varios flancos de forma simultánea y persistente y construyendo sus objetivos sobre el ensayo y error.

     

    • buscan proporcionar “bienestar integral” a los usuarios

     

    • ha diseñado un esquema de organización que pretende ser adaptable a las cambiantes necesidades de investigación, docencia y divulgación del Centro. Aunque la estructura oficial de su organigrama se encuentra en proceso de ajuste, a razón de los cambios inherentes a su proceso actual de institucionalización , se puede decir que a la fecha la dirección académica está en manos de un Consejo Interno cuyos miembros son el Director del[Esta/la iniciativa] , el Secretario Académico y cinco Coordinadores Ejecutivos a cargo de las Coordinaciones — Investigación, Docencia y Formación de Recursos Humanos, Vinculación y Extensión Académica, Ciencia de los Datos y el Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencias de la Complejidad y Servicios de Extensión. Éstas tienen un carácter transversal y no en forma de departamentos, con lo cual se espera que varias de sus actividades coincidan para asegurar un fluido trabajo de cooperación.

     

    • The above mentioned directory lists all the goods and services whose purchase accepts payment with Tumin (food, carpentry, tourism, education services, etc.). These businesses are also promoted through the magazine mentioned in subsection “d” of the previous point. The diversity of the partners is a crucial factor, because it allows a balance between the needs and the supply (says the current coordinator of the[This/the initiative] Project).

     

    • The creation of a user directory based on the planning of a consumer basket (that defines what kind of partners are needed, including foreign partners, if the locals cannot fulfil the need).

     

    • To attract members to the[This/the initiative] Project, the abovementioned coordination identifies people from the community who could enrich the diversity of products and services offered in the association’s directory (x),

     

    • Un catálogo o directorio de investigadores que facilite a. la identificación de potenciales colaboradores para proyectos específicos; b. La identificación de temas comunes de investigación en la universidad desde diferentes áreas del conocimiento; c. La posterior construcción de mecanismos de colaboración entre éstos. Dicho directorio podría ser alimentado con bases de datos ya existentes, como la del SNI por ejemplo, o bien los inventarios de distintas instancias de la universidad

     

    • Un banco de tiempo , que es una versión de lo que se conoce como monedas alternativas, las cuales han sido utilizadas por distintas comunidades u organizaciones como estrategias para regenerar o mejorar las relaciones entre sus miembros; facilitar su intercambio de bienes y servicios y sus dinámicas de cooperación en general; compensar su falta de acceso a dinero convencional; reducir su dependencia a recursos externos; y/o apoyar mecanismos de auto-organización alternativos. El principio básico de los bancos de tiempo, según uno de sus promotores, podría resumirse en que: “Al unirse a un banco de tiempo, las personas están de acuerdo en participar en un sistema que implica ganar y gastar créditos de tiempo. Cuando pasan una hora en una actividad que ayuda a los demás, ellos reciben un crédito de tiempo. Cuando necesitan ayuda de otros, pueden utilizar los créditos de tiempo que han acumulado”(x). Hoy, los bancos de tiempo operan en alrededor de 50 países y su modelo ha sido adaptado para proyectos de salud pública,  de intercambio de conocimientos especializados, de cohesión comunitaria e intercultural, de permacultura, de economía local, de apoyo a grupos vulnerables (como desempleados, jubilados y jóvenes reclusos), e incluso de cooperación entre empresas u otras organizaciones para el aprovechamiento de recursos escasos o sub-utilizados (x). El objetivo común es el uso de la moneda-tiempo como instrumento para motivar y potenciar las relaciones de intercambio entre los miembros de una comunidad u organización, y con ello fortalecer la capacidad de esta última para satisfacer de forma más efectiva sus propias necesidades. Por ello su circulación suele ser administrada por un broker o coordinador de red. Éste documenta, analiza y promueve los intercambios a partir de las ofertas y demandas señaladas por los miembros participantes (generalmente a través de un sitio web).  Como se trata de cubrir necesidades reales, la relación entre oferta y demanda es cuidadosamente vigilada tanto en el primer registro de los participantes, como a lo largo del proceso de conformación de la red de cooperación

     

    • la experiencia del Santa Fe Institute (x) quien ha puesto en marcha cursos cortos en diferentes modalidades, impartidos por investigadores asociados adscritos a diferentes universidades y centros de investigación y en donde su rol es, precisamente, el de organización convocante (u orquestador de redes). Además, cuenta con un proyecto de colaboración interinstitucional -grados conferidos por varias instituciones- llamado “Multiversity”.

     

    • El esquema de red que actualmente perfecciona el[Esta/la iniciativa]  también constituye un mecanismo para su sustentabilidad. Las redes duran más que las personas (especialmente con el carácter rotativo de la plantilla del[Esta/la iniciativa] ); permiten la creación de varios liderazgos y líneas de trabajo que no sólo se fortalecen unas a otras sino que sirven de respaldo por si alguna de ellas encuentra dificultades; gozan de presupuestos especiales; permiten compartir recursos y responsabilidades; y más importante, facilitan la misión del[Esta/la iniciativa] de abordar problemáticas de manera integral e inter/transdisciplinaria. En esta misma lógica, el[Esta/la iniciativa] se beneficia del trabajo de otros institutos de la universidad (y de fuera de ella), y les ofrece retroalimentación a cambio. Además, trabaja con el enfoque y métodos de la Complejidad, que al ofrecer herramientas para la comunicación transversal entre disciplinas, facilita la colaboración entre los miembros de su red. Ello tendrá alcances aún más significativos a largo plazo, pues el proceso de sintonización toma tiempo.

     

    • gracias al apoyo económico y emocional de parientes y amigos, se consiguió el terreno de su sede actual en 1997, en el que ellos mismos construyeron cabañas con materiales biodegradables y reciclados que hoy sirven de albergue a visitantes

     

    • Un sistema híbrido de energía (generador eólico, celdas solares y corriente eléctrica de la Comisión Federal de Electricidad, CFE). Esta combinación no sólo les permite ahorrar gastos y evitar fallos de abastecimiento (toda vez que la corriente eléctrica es más estable que las energías alternativas y la CFE deduce los excedentes de estas últimas), sino también reducir el impacto ambiental del establecimiento.

     

    • Una gama integral de medios para el descanso y el entretenimiento que hacen al lugar más atractivo para distintos tipos de huéspedes, diferenciándolo de otros hospedajes de la región: comedores, temazcal, un observatorio, cancha de squash, espacios para eventos (útiles para diversas necesidades específicas: paseos escolares, cursos de formación humana, bodas, retiros, etc).

     

    • A dicho éxito del proyecto ha ayudado la práctica de re-invertir todas las ganancias. También le ha servido el hecho de que sus promotores aceptan y fomentan, además del pago con dinero convencional, la práctica del trueque con los clientes (a quienes prefieren llamar visitantes). A la fecha este sistema les ha permitido intercambiar noches de hospedaje por publicidad, paneles solares, botellas de alcohol, e incluso trabajo – todo ello tras discutir la conveniencia para ambas partes de forma directa. Esta última modalidad de intercambio, el trabajo, es la única que no ha funcionado bien, pues al parecer ha habido mucho abuso por parte de los visitantes (que no trabajan lo prometido o se quedan más de lo acordado, por ejemplo). El trueque permite además que el[Esta/la iniciativa] pueda cumplir mejor con su misión de apoyar los proyectos personales de los visitantes, que son de distinta índole (retirados, mochileros, tesistas).

     

    • El lugar se ubica en una región rural con más de 50% de la población en condición de pobreza y más del 15% en la de extrema pobreza según cifras del 201⁠0. Aunque el objetivo de[Esta/la iniciativa] no es transformar las condiciones socioeconómicas de este lugar, sus creadores están conscientes de que es importante evitar acaparar las oportunidades económicas de la zona. Por ello, y quizá también porque al negocio le resulta más redituable, no les ha interesado ser completamente auto-sustentables en alimentos, los cuales compran en buena parte de sus vecinos. En este mismo sentido se han hecho intentos por establecer colaboraciones con los habitantes de la localidad para beneficio mutuo, ofreciéndoles acceso a su clientela a para vender sus productos o servicios (paseos a caballo, donas, etc), lo cual a ellos conviene también por ser un atractivo para los visitantes. Estas colaboraciones al parecer no han prosperado. Además de aparentes barreras socio-culturales y de género (la dueña del[Esta/la iniciativa] es una mujer y esta es una región conservadora), no se sabe bien qué ha impedido el interés de la comunidad para colaborar con este proyecto.  Incluso en alguna ocasión una pobladora local se negó a recibirles un grupo de gallinas que le ofrecieron a condición de que después le vendieran a El[Esta/la iniciativa] sus productos.

     

    • Uso de energías alternativas tanto por filosofía ambientalista como por pragmatismo: Generador eólico + paneles solares + CFE (porque energías alternativas son más baratas y CFE  te deduce lo que tu produzcas sobrante que le vendas pero no son estables y el hostal no se puede dar el lujo de que se le acabe la energía en días lluviosos o así).

     

    • Integración:

    Intentos de integración, lazos entre cosas que se refuerzan entre sí-:

    • a nivel proyecto (hospedaje, comedores, temazcal, generador eólico/solar, observatorio, espacio para eventos)

    •A nivel comunitario (gallinas, donas, etc)

    No se trata de acaparar sino de fortalecer a la comunidad. No gallinas propias, mejor comprar las de la vecina.

     

    • El[Esta/la iniciativa] es un negocio privado iniciado por X en 1960 cuya actividad económica principal, la venta de árboles de navidad, es complementada por una serie de programas que buscan promover la sensibilización y conservación ecológica, la educación ambiental y el desarrollo socioeconómico local. Ello le ha ganado varios premios por su contribución al desarrollo sustentable.
    [Esta/la iniciativa] ha rehabilitado 400 hectáreas de bosque (con aprox. medio millón de árboles), en un terreno antes devastado por el consumo descontrolado de leña para cocinar de la población local, necesidad que no se sabe de qué manera es satisfecha hoy día (si se desplazó la tala a otra región o si se ingeniaron nuevos medios para la cocina).

    La empresa da empleo formal a 70 trabajadores y temporal a aproximadamente 400 pobladores locales más que colaboran en temporada alta (fin de año): trabajadores de limpieza, taladores, guardabosques, guías, etc.

     

    • cultivos mixtos de árboles que evitarían que la plaga en un tipo árbol afectase a los otros y que previenen el desgaste de la tierra

     

    • Para facilitar la venta de los árboles fomentan dos tipos de colaboración que aseguran la integridad del proyecto y con ella su mayor proyección y atractivo sin la necesidad de invertir recursos extra:

    Colaboración estrecha y de mutuo beneficio con otras Sociedades Anónimas (S.A.):

    -Una ofrece paseos de integración, retiros y pláticas a la medida para empresas (Coca Cola, El Metro, Coppel, etc), lo que le sirve a [Esta/la iniciativa] para hacerse de recursos extra y publicidad.

    -Otra, Hacienda X (desde 1999), ofrece alojamiento (hotel y campamentos); visitas culturales al Museo de Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz y al Museo de los Volcanes, al laberinto inglés, al parque de los venados, las águilas y las serpientes acariciables; instalaciones de deportes extremos como la tirolesa. Todos estos servicios y más están disponibles gratuitamente a los clientes de [Esta/la iniciativa]. Además, la Hacienda le envía sus clientes a éste último en visitas diarias a cambio de lo cual éste les regala pequeños árboles, les ofrece pláticas sobre manejo sustentable de los bosques y paseos por el vivero y el bosque.

    -Otra más organiza visitas escolares que son reconocidas por la Secretaría de Educación Pública, pues están diseñadas de manera tal que sirvan para reforzar la enseñanza de materias del plan de estudios como ciencias, educación ambiental (manejo de basura, aprovechamiento del agua de lluvia, etc), civismo, etc. Estas visitas (van como 20 escuelas al día) tienen un costo de$140 pesos por alumno y representan un ingreso extra para [Esta/la iniciativa], quien a cambio obsequia cupones de descuento en árboles de navidad para cada alumno, un árbol pequeño del vivero y un certificado de participación. Aunque esta colaboración le es redituable a [Esta/la iniciativa] en términos financieros y de publicidad, un reto que tiene que vencer para asegurar un mayor impacto de su objetivo de sensibilización ambiental es la significativa apatía que parece caracterizar a buena parte de los alumnos y maestros que les visitan (una tercera parte según nuestra fuente).

    Colaboraciones de mutuo beneficio con la población local:

    -[Esta/la iniciativa] provee las instalaciones para un Bazar Navideño que da oportunidad a comerciantes durante la temporada alta de vender sus productos — a quienes selecciona en función de garantizar la diversidad en la oferta de productos y con ello, el mayor atractivo del bazar. Aunque la renta que [Esta/la iniciativa] recibe de éstos sólo le alcanza para mantener el lugar y no le representa ninguna ganancia monetaria, le sirve para hacer su lugar de venta de árboles más atractivo a gente que viene de otras partes del país.

    -Lo mismo sucede con el Mercado de comida navideño, en cuyo casi ni siquiera se le cobra renta a los vendedores, pues la mayoría son locales.

    -[Esta/la iniciativa] da permiso a pepenadores locales de recoger y aprovechar la basura, lo que le ayuda a su vez a mantener sus instalaciones limpias.

    -También da permiso a los pastores locales de traer sus borregos a pastar, lo que a [Esta/la iniciativa] le sirve para que éstos corten el pasto y le abonen.

    El terreno cuenta además con una sección llamada “Bosque Santo” en donde se da permiso a visitantes de depositar las cenizas de sus difuntos.

    • Combinación cultura, diversión, ecología

     

    • Los proyectos que ha adoptado[Esta/la iniciativa] hasta el momento pueden dividirse en:
      • Producción alimentaria sustentable: Agricultura urbana, apicultura, avicultura, lombricultura y composta, producción de tortillas artesanales, cafetería/restaurante
      • Integración ambiental: Mariposario, bioconstrucción, captadores de agua pluvial
      • Salud y deporte: Calistenia, artes marciales, bicicleta de montaña, yoga, dog park, temazcal tradicional
      • Tecnología: Talleres de drones y automatización de huertos urbanos.

    El proyecto busca ser integral a diferentes niveles. En primer lugar, los proyectos se complementarían entre sí: el huerto urbano compraría composta y su producción abastecería al restaurante, por ejemplo. En segundo lugar, se ofrece a los clientes una diversidad de actividades de forma que se aumenten los rendimientos de su visita: además de hacer algún deporte, pueden tomar un taller de apicultura, visitar el mariposario, comer en el restaurante y llevar a su perro a entrenar. En tercer lugar, se ofrecen talleres, capacitaciones y visitas escolares, de manera que se transmite el conocimiento y la sensibilización de temas ambientales con el público en general a todos los niveles. Esto haría al proyecto más sustentable en la medida en que sus actividades tengan un alcance a largo plazo en la población que participa.

    [Esta/la iniciativa] proporciona apoyo a los proyectos en forma de espacio físico, pero también les otorga asesorías, infraestructura, consigue clientes, organiza eventos y talleres y establece alianzas internas y externas.

    INTEGRACIÓN EXTERNA: Colaborarán con otros proyectos locales:

    Asociación de vecinos (estacionamiento, club hípico, parque perros a cambio de rehabilitación de la zona – senderos y así

    Lombricomposta: venden tierra fertilizante (humus), agua residual fertilizante y lombriquetas (croquetas de lombriz que sirven de alimento para gallinas)

    Mariposario: criadero, sensibilización cuidado mariposas

    Restaurante: le comprará a huerto su producción X: “yo decido qué producirá huerto en gran medida porque seré su mayor comprador” (constraint/condicionante que los del huerto han aceptado con gusto)

    Intercambio: que financiarán con surpluses de proyectos como SAPI a cambio probablemente de deducibilidad – y usarán de espacio para proyectos SAPI.

    Objetivo beneficios a varias dimensiones:

    General: “nueva propuesta de vida urbana” + for profit.

    1. Familiar: empresa que genere fondos

    2. Proyectos privados que trabajando en colectivo con objetivos de interés socio-ambiental  puedan tener un lucro

    3. Individuos/clientes (bienestar integral-ir y pasar un día ahí aprendiendo y disfrutando)

    4. Comunidades aledañas (a futuro, rehabilitación de la zona y con proyecto concesión quieren regeneración ambiental, mitigar erosión, senderos, paisajismo, limpiar agua)

    Todos: Beneficios por regeneración ambiental.

    A individuos beneficiados:

    Bienestar integral (deporte, arte, cultura, salud, alimentación)

    aprendizaje

    Tipos de proyecto: deporte -extremos, acroyoga-, temazcal, apicultura, mariposario, producción de alimentos orgánicos -tortillería, huerto-, gallinas, composta, colección de agua, bioconstrucción, lombricomposta.

    En el terreno actual, de una hectárea, se hospedan varios proyectos de producción de alimentos, educación, salud, deporte y cultura, todos los cuales deben ser negocios financieramente autosustentables. En lugar de una renta fija, cada proyecto paga a[Esta/la iniciativa] un porcentaje de sus ingresos que varía según el acuerdo establecido al inicio de la colaboración. La asociación paralela a[Esta/la iniciativa] ,[Esta/la iniciativa] A.C., acaba de recibir en concesión 300 hectáreas de las barrancas de Las Águilas y Tarango por treinta años a cambio de regenerarlas.

    • Further integrating its different development initiatives.

     

    • [This/the initiative] ’s development model is integrated because of the interconnections that exist amongst its various interventions, which are emphasized in the understanding that attending the communities’ needs in an integral way implies recognizing that community life is integral itself; that all age sectors have to be attended; and, that one area can support another because it is frequently the same people that are involved.[This/the initiative] ’s institutional integration process consists of consolidating each area’s relevant institutions and trying to establish a transversal project.

     

    • However, to achieve this level of integration is very difficult, as many factors work against it: The responsibilities of[This/the initiative] ’s staff are distributed by areas and each area’s responsible has to be accountable for the programs at his/her charge, to ensure maintaining donors support. While all personnel are encouraged to be involved in all areas of work, they can only do it superficially because they have to concentrate on their own projects. Most importantly, the donors support very concrete/thematic agendas. Their funding criteria are not integral and they expect concrete results in concrete areas. So each area coordinator is generally responsible for the results of its domain and not the other.

     

    To counteract these effects,[This/the initiative] :

    -Ensures all its personnel are at least aware of the purpose and situation of[This/the initiative] ’s other initiatives.

    -Distributes the funding collected across initiatives.

    -Searches for partnerships that not only expand the amount of services provided to the communities it serves but the support of one initiative to another.

    -Uses participatory mapping as the departing point of all of its programs. This methodology not only enhances people’s ownership but also enables the description of people’s integral perspective about their community, its components, conflicts, resources, problems, needs, as well as the possible strategies to respond to all of them.

    -The circus integrates the way people learn, conceptualize, and appropriate[This/the initiative] ’s initiatives because it uses different languages (dancing, singing, talking) to interrelate knowledge.

    -Articulates different initiatives (e.g. people from the craft program receive tourists from the eco-tourism program and incentivize the territorial management organization; the renewable energy program provides energy to the Telecenters; the education program supports health prevention participative activities and environmental endeavours, etc.).

    -Uses PMES annual cycles (planning, monitoring, evaluation, and systematization) to ensure the organization’s initiatives are working transversally. So, for example, in January and February the organization devotes itself to define and publish its annual plan (which includes objectives, activities, indicators, expected outcomes, and funding administration and sources). In June and July, they do a mid-year evaluation and adapt the plan accordingly. And finally, in December they make an annual evaluation and plan the next cycle.

    • some of the recommended strategies contained in the Strategic Plan for [This/the initiative]’s sustainability and scalability are:
      • The formation of a network of multipliers.
      • The expansion of communication tools.
      • The inter-institutional exchange of methodological processes of expansion.
      • The transfer, dissemination, and replication of environmental technologies.
      • The cooperation with the public and private sector.
      • The methodological reorientation to ensure a greater interaction with public policies and both public and private institutions, identifying common demands and possible cooperation initiatives, using information technologies for gaining scale.

     

    • [This/the initiative] ’s Strategies for Scalability

    Not only the vision but also the strategies of the organization intend all to create replicable models of action whose objective is to serve as demonstrative references for the State (not the government) and/or the private sector, so they learn better and cheaper ways for designing and implementing public policies/projects and adopt them.

    X argued that the organization’s mission is to create links between communities and partners from abroad rather than monopolizing the former; meaning that their objective is to create development models that can be further scaled by agents that are capable of implementing and funding them sustainably. Once this mission is achieved, the organization’s aim is to change its role from implementing the programs to creating management capacities in the communities, to oversee their continuous persistence and quality after adopted by either the State or the private sector.

    [This/the initiative] is currently requesting an independent agency’s help to systematize[This/the initiative] ’s intervention model to be able to scale it, providing that it considers itself as a low cost and high impact sustainable development alternative whose construction is based on the know-how gained from more than 20 years of working with marginalized populations in the Amazon.

    In collaboration with[This/the initiative] , Ashoka and McKinsey & Company (2010) made a noteworthy multi-annual strategic plan for scaling-up[This/the initiative] ’s program (hereafter referred as the Strategic Plan) to envisage the perspectives and recommendations to expand[This/the initiative] and achieve, in 5 years, a “community integrated development participative model, with proper socio-environmental technologies, with low cost and high impact, consolidated in all direct attention areas and ready for replication in other regions” (x).

    The Strategic Plan explores the characteristics of[This/the initiative] ’s model and its principal strengths and weaknesses before making some suggestions to the organization – all of them very illustrative of the factors related to its level of self-sustainability.

    It describes the organization’s value chain: the inputs it receives (e.g. financial resources, social demands, human resources, data, and information), the means through which the organization works to create value (e.g. participative processes, democracy, partnerships, strategic planning, trainings, exchanges, inter and multidisciplinary approaches, adaptation of international social technologies into the local context, and methodologies for the strengthening of community groups), and its outputs (e.g. learning and information, trust relationships, reference models for development initiatives, self-esteem, autonomy, social inclusion, influence in public policies, social work, trained professionals).

    The Strategic Plan also evaluates[This/the initiative] ’s strengths (e.g. proper and replicable social technologies, measured benefits, co-management capacity, team’s expertise, knowledge on the region, capacity to propose and adapt, network of partners, visibility and credibility obtained, both locally and abroad), its opportunities (e.g. work in a region with global visibility – the Amazon – network of contacts, scope for gaining scale because of the interest that public administrations have on[This/the initiative] ’s work), its weakness (e.g. spread of energy and resources in too many actions, non-satisfactory working conditions, insufficiency in the system of management and systematization of experiences, little participation of the Associates’ Council), and its challenges (lack of stability in the funding sources, limitedness and lack of flexibility of the resources available for institutional strengthening, lack of appropriateness of national policies for the Amazonian region, Amazonian predatory occupation processes).

     

    • To enlarge[This/the initiative] ’s reach without compromising its quality, the Strategic Plan recommends dividing the 5 years into 3 stages. During the first one, the areas that are currently intervened are consolidated as a permanent laboratory, its results are more comprehensively systematized, and priority is given to the Institutional Integration (which includes developing its communication means, inter-institutional agreements, methodological exchanges and consultancies, adapted socio-environmental expansion, transference, dissemination, and replication processes).

    During the second stage, the area of dissemination is gradually expanded, starting with[This/the initiative] ’s more consolidated social technologies, especially 1) the health initiative – which includes preparatory actions for scalability (systematization of the Basic Attention Model that[This/the initiative] has implemented and is offering now to the new beneficiaries, consultancy services portfolio, prospective of potential regions and actors for the replication of the model, etc.). And, 2) its integrative development practices: also needs preparatory actions. Start with strategies of participative diagnosis and planning (conjuncture, identification of local actors and their perceptions, research about priorities for short, middle, and long terms, sectorial competences, etc.) culminating with a Development Plan with Recommendations for the application in the area of work.

    Finally, stage 3 is suggested to be about articulating the Amazon with other regions around the globe, attracting proactive and strategic connections.

    Define a program for institutional integration that:

    a. Designs and systematizes a long-term a transversal project that increases the existing interconnections amongst[This/the initiative] ’s development initiatives and the Night Schools.

    b. Settles partnerships between internal and external agents for the concrete purpose of increasing the[This/the initiative] model’s integration with the Night Schools and the mutual support of its initiatives.

    c. Departs from a diagnosis of[This/the initiative] ’s current intervention model, and defines a short-term pilot project area to begin the integration process using, perhaps, participatory mapping as a methodology.

    d. Uses PMES annual cycles (planning, monitoring, evaluation, and systematization) to ensure the organization’s initiatives are working transversally.

    e. Uses the already existing information-communication technologies (ICTs) in the Night Schools to integrate them into the[This/the initiative] ’s other initiatives.

    A plan for institutional integration (which includes developing its communication means, inter-institutional agreements, methodological exchanges and consultancies, transference, dissemination, and replication processes).